Seven members of the Los Angeles-based fraud ring have been convicted of embezzling more than $ 20 million in payment protection program and the EIDL-Covide-19 aid fund.

On November 15, U.S. District Court Judge Stephen V. Marietta Terabelian, 37, up to six years in prison; And Arthur Ayvazyan, 41, to five years in prison, all of Encino, for their involvement in the plot.

Earlier, on October 25, Judge Wilson sentenced Manuk Gregory, 28, to six years in prison in the Sun Valley. Edvard Paronian, 41, of Granada Hills, sentenced to 30 months in prison; Vahe Dadian, 42, Glendale, October 18 for one year and one day in prison; And Arman Hyrapetian, 39, of Glendale, on October 18 for a 10-month probationary period.

Court Documents and Evidence Based on evidence presented in June 2021, the defendants used dozens of fake, stolen or artificial identities – including elderly or deceased persons and students who had recently visited the United States for a short time and had not returned – to file fraudulent applications for 150 PPP and EIDL loans. . Defendants filed fraudulent and fraudulent documents, including forged IDs, tax documents, and payrolls, to support creditors and small business management (SBA) to support fraudulent loan applications. Defendants then fraudulently used the proceeds to pay off the luxury apartments of Tarzana, Glendale and Palm Desert. They also used the money to buy gold coins, diamonds, jewelry, luxury watches, fine furniture, designer bags, clothing, and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. The conspirators have embezzled more than $ 20 million from Covid-19 aid funds.

“The defendants planned to steal large sums of money intended to help small businesses in the event of a pandemic,” said Kenneth A., aide to the Department of Justice’s Criminal Division. Politi Jr. said. “This is the first case of its kind in the country, including the case of a major pandemic. The Department of Justice, together with our law enforcement partners, will continue to use all available resources to prevent criminals from using national disasters for personal gain.

Central District U.S. Attorney Tracy L. Wilkinson said: “The defendants used the Covenant-19 crisis to steal government aid that was vital to people and businesses. California. “These statements reflect our commitment to prosecuting and punishing those who use national emergencies to defraud the government and the US taxpayer.”

“In this case, the defendants have openly defrauded government aid programs, and have used their illicit money for personal gain,” said Jay Greenberg, acting director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigations Unit. “This decision demonstrates the determination of the FBI and our partners to prosecute individuals who use national emergencies as an opportunity for criminal activity.”

“Conspiracy to rob victims of their identities and subsequent taxpayers’ money, which is crucial for the country’s small businesses, will be brought to justice,” said SNA Inspector General Hannibal “Mike Ware.” “The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is working tirelessly with its law enforcement partners. I would like to thank the Department of Justice and our law enforcement partners for their diligence and commitment to justice.

Ryan El-Corner, IIS-Special Investigator at the Los Angeles Field Office, said: “At a time when the people of our country were in dire straits, these individuals were only trying to pocket their own money. These statements reflect the seriousness of these crimes.

“The Inspector General’s Office is proud to be working with our law enforcement partners to prevent, identify and prevent fraudulent attempts in the Federal Mortgage Bank system and to steal the funds intended for small business owners and employees in this important segment,” said the CARES Act. “The fact that the team was able to investigate the incident at the time of the outbreak shows a great deal of concern for themselves and their loved ones,” said Jay N Johnson, Special Representative of the Chief Inspector for the Western Region Office of the Inspector General of Police.

Defendants Richard Ivazian, Therabelian, Artur Ivazian, and Vahe Dadian were convicted on June 25 after a judge hearing. Prior to the sentencing, Gregory pleaded guilty on June 7 to one count of felony criminal mischief and one count of aggravated robbery with intent to defraud; Paronyan was charged with wiretapping on June 11; And Hirapetian pleaded guilty on June 21. Tamara Dadiyan pleaded guilty on June 14. That movement is still pending.

Richard Ivazian and Terrabialia fled before the verdict and were sentenced in absentia. They will flee. The FBI is offering a reward of up to $ 20,000 for information leading to the capture of Ivazian and Terrabeli.

Prosecutor Christopher Fenton is suing the Department of Justice fraud and U.S. attorneys Scott Patty, Brian Feststein, and California Central District Catherine Ahn. Assistant U.S. Attorney Dan Boyle is handling the charges in the Central District of California.

Fraud The Criminal Division prosecutes fraudsters who exploit the PPP. Since the enactment of the CARES Act, more than 150 defendants have been charged with more than 95 criminal offenses and more than $ 75 million in cash from the PPP fund, as well as a number of real estate and luxury goods seized. Such revenues. More information can be found at https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/ppp-fraud.

On May 17, 2021, the Attorney General established the Covd-19 Fraud Task Force to increase the efforts of the Department of Justice in collaboration with government agencies to combat and prevent pandemic-related fraud. The task force will intensify its efforts to investigate and prosecute the most responsible domestic and international criminals, and will assist agencies responsible for administering aid programs by adding and including coordination mechanisms to prevent fraud, identifying resources and methods to identify fraudulent actors. Sharing and sharing information and insights from their plans, and pre-implementation efforts. For more information on the department’s response to the pandemic, please visit https://www.justice.gov/coronavirus.

Anyone with information about the Covenant-19 fraud case should call the National Disaster Fraud Center (NCDF) at the Department of Justice at 866-720-5721 or the NCDF web complaint form at https: // www. Justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.